Archive for the ‘Leadership on the Line – The Workbook’ Category

Why Service-Based Leadership Matters

Saturday, May 4th, 2019

Service-Based Leaders have to balance the needs of the customers, their employees, the business and themselves. It is a lot to handle, particularly for new leaders. Leadership on the Line – The Workbook by Ed Rehkopf is not a rehashed list of stagnant advice. The Workbook is an interactive experience that allows readers to assess their individual needs to cultivate their employee relationships, customer service and leadership skills.

What sets The Workbook apart from other leadership guides is the intense level of self-analysis that it provides. This book helps readers learn about the motivations behind their behavior. It provides advice on how to build a leadership foundation based on character traits and interpersonal relationships. The book can be used as self-study or as part of a guided instruction.

It is important to note that this book is the most effective for those who are willing to honestly examine their beliefs and behaviors. Skimming through the text without participating in the exercises will not be as beneficial to the reader. The more a person puts into The Workbook, the greater the outcome will be.

Strong leadership is dependent upon strong relationships. One of the first exercises in The Workbook helps the reader to determine who his or her constituencies are. Creating a list of people who depend upon you is the first step to figuring out their needs and how you can best meet those needs. The Workbook teaches the reader how to nurture the relationships with all constituencies in order to improve employee and customer relations.

The Workbook also examines the relationship between the reader and his or her boss. Being a Service-Based Leader does not give a person free reign, so this portion of the book is particularly helpful. The Workbook asserts that you are responsible for your boss’s opinion of you. By considering what can be done to help manage your boss, The Workbook helps readers enhance their relationships with their superiors.

The strength of The Workbook is how much ground it covers in under one hundred pages. It addresses everything from engagement and accountability to standards and policies with the same honest introspection. Moreover, the lessons learned in this book can help people in any stage of their career path. Newly hired leaders can use The Workbook to appraise their strengths and weaknesses and help them develop their managerial style. Established leaders can use the book to reexamine the way that they work and how it affects the people around them.

Since The Workbook is so personal, it fosters different results for each individual. Ed Rehkopf created a work that helps people customize their leadership approach. The Workbook guides readers into having reasons behind their actions instead of acting solely out of habit. The book explains that there isn’t one particular way to be a leader. Different strategies will work for different people, and The Workbook celebrates that fact. Ed Rehkopf teaches that leadership isn’t something a person just has. Leadership must be developed, and The Workbook is a powerful tool to help people do just that.

Reviewed by Erin

Leadership – Consistency and Common Decency

Saturday, April 20th, 2019

In addition to possessing integrity and demonstrating competence, leaders must also be consistent in their values and vision.  Such consistency requires a foundation of principles for one’s actions and a well-developed guide for how to proceed.  Followers will quickly lose confidence in an erratic leader or one without a clear and compelling vision.

Being consistent does not in any way imply rigidity or inflexibility in your thinking, planning, or execution.  A hallmark of leadership is the recognition that we operate in a fluid world where everything changes all the time.  As German military theorist von Moltke said, “No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.”  The same could be said for any plan and the constantly unfolding realities faced by every enterprise.

When a leader demonstrates consistent values and a persistent pursuit of well-defined objectives, followers can feel confident in their leader and the direction he is taking them.  An unpredictable leader, who bounces from one initiative to another and whose plans, performance, and behavior are constantly changing, creates a situation much like the Doom Loop described by Jim Collins in Good to Great.

“The comparison companies followed a different pattern, the doom loop.  Rather than accumulating momentum, turn by turn of the flywheel, they tried to skip buildup and jump immediately to breakthrough.  Then, with disappointing results, they’d lurch back and forth, failing to maintain consistent direction.”

Employees can deal with some agenda changes from senior management, but continually changing initiatives sap them of their enthusiasm and willingness to adapt.  This is particularly so when they are not involved in decision-making and they are not treated as if they matter.

This brings us to common decency and how followers are treated.  While every person may have his or her own conception of what is decent, common decency encompasses those behaviors considered to be the ideal in human intercourse.  Among them are:

  • Respect – regard or consideration for others and their needs.
  • Sensitivity – heightened awareness to needs and concerns of others.
  • Courtesy – polite behavior, respect, consideration, helpfulness.
  • Kindness – goodwill, generosity, charity, and sympathy toward others.
  • Generosity of Spirit – absence of meanness or smallness of mind or character.

When a leader demonstrates these behaviors in his dealings with all constituents, it naturally creates strong, trusting relationships.  Once again, though, consistency is essential.  A leader cannot be kind one day and callous the next and expect his constituents to trust him.

As children we are taught the common decency of the Golden Rule-treating others as we wish to be treated.  But as we grow older we are often faced with stressful situations and unpleasant people who cause us to develop our own defensive responses and disagreeable behaviors.

Yet, just as these habits were learned over time, they can be unlearned by conscious effort.  While we cannot control what happens to us, we can control our reactions to events.  Making the effort to treat others well will go a long way toward building meaningful relationships with all constituents.

Excerpted from Leadership on the Line – The Workbook, Ed Rehkopf, Clarity Publications, 2009

Thanks and have a great day!

Ed Rehkopf

This weekly blog comments on and discusses the hospitality industry and its challenges. From time to time, we will feature guest bloggers – those managers and industry experts who have something of interest to say to all of us. We also welcome feedback and comment upon the blog, hoping that it will become a useful sounding board for what’s on the minds of hardworking managers throughout the country and around the world.

Leadership – Charisma and Trust

Sunday, April 7th, 2019

People often speak of an especially effective leader’s charisma – that somewhat mysterious ability to connect with people in a profound and moving way.  We can all think of leaders, usually on the national or international stage, who possessed charisma.  Some names that come to mind include Eleanor Roosevelt, with her quick wit and commitment to social equity, and Ronald Reagan, called the “Great Communicator” for his skill in connecting with people.  More recently we recognize Oprah Winfrey and her engaging manner with people from all walks of life and Martin Luther King Jr. for his soaring oratory and message of nonviolent change.

While charisma can add to a leader’s skill set, it must be based upon a foundation of trust.  Without earned and merited trust, a charismatic personality is little more than a con artist.

Two important ways to gain and hold the trust of followers and other constituents is to demonstrate both integrity and competence in all you do.

Integrity is not simply honesty, though truth and truthfulness are significant parts of it.  Ultimately integrity is being true to yourself and your beliefs.  The dictionary defines integrity as “the adherence to moral or ethical principles.”  This implies that one’s actions match her words – that she does what she says she will do regardless of consequences, that she has a moral compass that guides her in all instances, that she can be counted on to do the right thing.  At the end of the day, a person who has integrity can be trusted by others in all situations.

In addition to possessing integrity a leader must demonstrate competence.  No one wants to follow someone who is inept, no matter what authority he may possess.  In fighting wars a follower’s life may depend upon it.  During the Civil War a fellow officer said of Gen. Nathaniel Banks that it was murder to send soldiers out under him.  While this political appointee of President Lincoln had the authority to command, he clearly did not possess the competence to lead.

The U.S. Marine Corps in its Fundamentals of Marine Corps Leadership tells its aspiring leaders that they must be technically and tactically proficient.  To develop this ability, they are told to “seek a well-rounded [professional] education” and to “seek out and associate with capable leaders.  [To] observe and study their actions.”  Lastly, Marines are told to prepare themselves for the job of leader at the next higher rank.  This advice applies to leadership in any situation or endeavor.

By cultivating and demonstrating both integrity and competence in all you do, you will gain the trust of your followers.  While only a gifted few possess natural charisma, it may be argued that it is not required for the smaller arenas in which most of us labor.  Yet as you continue to grow and nurture your leadership skills through practice and experience, you may discover that your followers consider your leadership to be charismatic.  As with beauty, charisma is in the eye of the beholder.

Excerpted from Leadership on the Line – The Workbook, Ed Rehkopf, Clarity Publications, 2009

Thanks and have a great day!

Ed Rehkopf

This weekly blog comments on and discusses the hospitality industry and its challenges. From time to time, we will feature guest bloggers – those managers and industry experts who have something of interest to say to all of us. We also welcome feedback and comment upon the blog, hoping that it will become a useful sounding board for what’s on the minds of hardworking managers throughout the country and around the world.